25 April 2014

Across the centuries

Garth Wilshere

14/04/2010 7:52:00 a.m.

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The Tudor Consort, Music Director Michael Stewart, Sacred Heart Cathedral, reviewed by Garth Wilshere

THE tradition of excellent Good Friday concerts from The Tudor Consort continued this year with Lamentatio Jeremiae Prophetae (The Lamentations of Jeremiah).
With 15 voices under their Musical Director Michael Stewart they make a well balanced sound.
The cathedral lit by candles and subdued lighting, was an atmospheric scene was set for the ethereal singing of the 16th century works.
The settings of Thomas Tallis were interspersed with Gregorian chants from members of the consort.
The beautiful Palestrina setting and the remarkable one by Robert White, which seemed strikingingly modern in feel despite its 16th century origins, were great.
The desperately moving 20th century setting by Ernst Krenek, who fled Nazism for America, and composed his Lamentations in 1941, demonstrated the consort’s excellence in works across the centuries.
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Best of Wellington 2012

Briefs

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